Tag Archives: Omega

Omega, Olympic Tradition

Omega Olympic Collection, Revisits History

Since there is still a buzz in the air about the 2010 Olympic Games, I think it’s fitting to take some time and look over the Omega Olympic Collection.  Omega’s partnership with the Olympic Games goes way back, 70 years to be exact.  It seems fated that the company with the Greek originated name would end up having such a strong relationship with the Olympics.  As the Official Timekeeper to the Olympic (and Paralympic) Games, Omega’s reputation for precision and excellence has only improved.  The Olympic Collection is made up of six timepieces.  Each one replicates designs that the Swiss watchmaker has produced for the 1932-1960 Olympic Games.  The watches are all individual, but there are a few similarities.  All the hours are marked by Arabic numerals, and the Omega logo and name are displayed above the hands, in a bright red.  The seconds hand is also in this vibrant red shade.  Of course, the Olympic rings adorn the face, and the case back is inscribed with the Official Timekeeper stamp, certifying its authenticity.  The Seamaster Chronograph, Speedmaster Date, and the De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph are all Omega designs that make up the Olympic Collection, as well as the De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph Women’s watch.  Keeping time for the Olympics, and you…Omega!

Watch Tags: Omega, Sport Watches

Omega Watches Are Out Of This World

Omega, Official Olympic Timekeeper

Omega Watches have been  premier watchmakers for decades.  The Omega Watch name stands for quality and style.  Innovation and state-of-the-art technology define Omegas philosophy, and these principles continue to push this company into the forefront of their field.

The Omega Watch logo has long been associated with excellence.  In 1999 Omega unveiled its first wristwatch featuring their Co-Axial mechanical movement.  This is, quite simply the most advanced, well-made mechanical watch movements in the world, and just one of Omegas accomplishments.

Omega Watches have been to the moon and back, literally.  In 1969 the Omega Speedmaster Chronograph was the first watch to travel to the moon, with Buzz Aldrin…and the speedmaster continues to be a standard piece of equipment on all space missions. 

As the official timekeeper of the Olympic Games since 1932, Omega is dedicated to maintaining their exceptional reputation.  Reflecting on the innovations in official timekeeping and creating technologies to accommodate for those advances has been a tireless effort by Omega.  The 2012 Olympic Games will be held in London, and will mark the 80th year that Omega has served as the official timekeeper.

If the Omega watch is good enough for the astronauts and Olympic athletes…I’m pretty sure they make a timepiece to my standards.  Omega…timeless, quality.

Watch Tags: Luxury Watches, Omega, omega watches

Luxury Watches: The Inteligent Choice

Luxury watches have been around for nearly two centuries. The concept of keeping time on one’s wrist was something revolutionary during the 1800s. Before the wrist-watch, the most common time-keeping instrument was a pocket watch. Pocket watches eventually became obsolete as the wrist watch was far more convenient and harder to misplace.

Some of the first luxury watch brands to emerge during the 1800s include TAG Heuer, Omega and Audemars Piguet. The term luxury watch refers to the quality with which the timepiece is hand crafted and the rare materials that are used in the manufacturing phase. By these standards, all watches during the 19th century were “luxury” time pieces.

With the lack of mass production and industrialization there were no cheap knock off watches to purchase. All time-keeping instruments were made by skilled watch makers, who made a life out of crafting small pieces of metal into time-keeping art. Today, the facility with which lower grade quartz watches can be mass produced has given a greater sense of distinction to watches that are made in the traditional manner.

All watches were originally mechanical. The employment of battery and quartz watches did not occur until the 20th century. Mechanical watches function by winding the crown of the watch, which in turn makes the movement unwind and keep time. The development of automatic watches was a great advancement. Automatic watches function brilliantly by having a pendulum inside the movement. The pendulum moves as your wrist does. When it moves it constantly winds itself, a feature that provides self-efficiency. Watches that are made in this manner are more practical, of better quality, more precise and much classier.

Luxury watches today are made the same way they were originally hand crafted more than 200 years ago. Switzerland is the country of origin for most high-end watch manufacturers. The art of watch making finds its roots in this country as well.

Most mass produced wrist-watches are such low-grade quality that they generally don’t last more than a year. Besides being low in quality, they do not keep time with precision. They will most likely lose 1-2 minutes a month, or up to 5 minutes if the watch is exceptionally defective. Besides all these inconveniences, batteries for cheap watches have to be changed at least once a year. Given all these characteristics, it is far more intelligent to purchase a quality time-piece that will last longer, yield a return if purchased as an investment and look like a piece of art on your hand.

Watch Tags: Audemars Piguet, Luxury Watches, Omega, TAG Heuer

Time to Go: Send Them Off with a Watch

Eighteen years at home and your kid is about to leave for his first day of college. You’re either rejoicing your new found freedom and independence again or weeping at the thought that you’re baby is all grown up. Like any parent, you’re probably a mixture of both feelings.

Either way, if you’re looking for the perfect “send off” gift, get him or her a cool, designer watch. A good, solid watch will come in handy in many ways. First of all, every time they look at it, they’ll think of you! Second, they won’t have an excuse to be late to class. Third, watches last a lifetime; it’s the gift that won’t ever stop giving; it can one day be something that your son or daughter will be able to pass on to their own children. And fourth, (again, back to you), your baby will think you’re super cool if you get them a watch that they’ll feel cool wearing.

Whether it’s a top notch watch like Bvlgari, Cartier, Baume & Mercier, or something less expensive (Gucci watches are priced well), like a Tissot, Omega or Movado watch.

A great, fun watch for young women is anything and everything by Michele watches. For young men, try a sporty watch, like a T-Touch by Tissot or a Raymond Weil.

Whatever you choose, remember these two things when weighing your options. #1: don’t pay retail and #2: don’t buy a replica.

Oh and lastly, don’t go with some cheese ball watch from a celebrity’s line. Why people like Jessica Simpson and Paris Hilton even bother to design watches they think people will buy is beyond me, but I can tell you, that it’s definitely not cool for your college-bound baby to sport something designed for teenagers.

Watch Tags: designer watch, Gucci, Michele, Movado, Omega, t-touch

Omega Shines with Phelps and Rosolino

After much drama and analysis over bathing suits and world records, Michael Phelps, Ambassador for Omega watches, won against Serbian Milorad Cavic, who had become quite the rival. Phelps not only beat Cavic but became the first swimmer ever to break 50 seconds in 100 meter butterfly. The Serbian swimmer had earlier this month, also broken the 50 second mark, but Phelps swam faster at the Foro Italico race with a time of 49.82 seconds.

The reason this race and rivalry has received so much attention is two-fold. Since last year’s Beijing Olympics in this same 100 meter event, Cavic, who lost to Phelps by one-hundredth of a second, has maintained that the Omega timing systems were faulty and that he actually touched first and should have won the gold medal. Then came the recent insults about bathing suits, with Cavic offering to get Phelps one of the supposedly faster polyurethane suits, like the Arena-X Glide that he wears. But it seems that Phelps in his American-made Speedo LZR Racer swimsuit did just fine indeed.

After the race, the two rivals finally shook hands and Cavic did say one thing to Phelps: “You’re the man.”

Another amazing swimmer to join the Omega team is 30 year-old Italian Massimiliano Rosolino, becoming the company’s newest spokesperson.  

Omega signed Rosolino at the perfect time, since he will undoubtedly be one of the main stars at the next World Championships in Rome 2009. Omega will also be the official timekeeper of these games. Rosolino, who hails from Naples, always wears the Omega Seamaster that has his name inscribed on the back and which was given to him as a gift after his 2000 victory in Sydney. Rosolino has said that he loves Omega watches because “they express the good taste of those who wear them.”

Watch Tags: Luxury Watches, men's watches, Omega, omega seamaster, omega watches, sports watches

Luxury Watches: The Inteligent Choice

Luxury Watch Movement
Luxury Watch Movement

Luxury watches have been around for nearly two centuries. The concept of keeping time on one’s wrist was something revolutionary during the 1800s. Before the wrist-watch, the most common time-keeping instrument was a pocket watch. Pocket watches eventually became obsolete as the wrist watch was far more convenient and harder to misplace. Some of the first luxury watch brands to emerge during the 1800s include Tag Heuer, Omega and Audemars Piguet. The term luxury watch refers to the quality with which the timepiece is hand crafted and the rare materials that are used in the manufacturing phase. By these standards, all watches during the 19th century were “luxury” time pieces.

With the lack of mass production and industrialization there were no cheap knock off watches to purchase. All time-keeping instruments were made by skilled watch makers, who made a life out of crafting small pieces of metal into time-keeping art. Today, the facility with which lower grade quartz watches can be mass produced has given a greater sense of distinction to watches that are made in the traditional manner.

All watches were originally mechanical. The employment of battery and quartz watches did not occur until the 20th century. Mechanical watches function by winding the crown of the watch, which in turn makes the movement unwind and keep time. The development of automatic watches was a great advancement. Automatic watches function brilliantly by having a pendulum inside the movement. The pendulum moves as your wrist does. When it moves it constantly winds itself, a feature that provides self-efficiency. Watches that are made in this manner are more practical, of better quality, more precise and much classier.

Luxury watches today are made the same way they were originally hand crafted more than 200 years ago. Switzerland is the country of origin for most high-end watch manufacturers. The art of watch making finds its roots in this country as well.

Most mass produced wrist-watches are such low-grade quality that they generally don’t last more than a year. Besides being low in quality, they do not keep time with precision. They will most likely lose 1-2 minutes a month, or up to 5 minutes if the watch is exceptionally defective. Besides all these inconveniences, batteries for cheap watches have to be changed at least once a year. Given all these characteristics, it is far more intelligent to purchase a quality time-piece that will last longer, yield a return if purchased as an investment and look like a piece of art on your hand.

Watch Tags: Audemars Piguet, Expensive Watches, Luxury Watches, Omega, TAG Heuer